How Should I Interpret My Resting Heart Rate and HRV?

What can you learn by monitoring your resting heart rate and heart rate variability? Many things, it turns out. This article highlights a few of them.

Heart Rate Variability (HRV)

HRV is the constant variation in milliseconds between your heartbeats and it reflects your heart's ability to respond to different situations. You can view yours on Oura's Readiness tab.

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The following are unwritten rules that you can follow when looking at your HRV in Oura:

• A higher HRV might be the result of a much-needed rest day, a cool bedroom at night, or participation in more mindful, low-to-moderate-intensity activities like hiking or yoga.

• A lower HRV might be the result of dehydration, consumption of alcohol, a late meal, a late workout, sickness, acute stress, or a hot bedroom at night.

Make a mental note of the choices you make throughout the day, and use tags to reflect on choices that either help or hurt your HRV.

Resting Heart Rate (RHR)

RHR is the number of times your heart beats per minute when you’re at rest and is viewed as a good indicator of your sleep quality, recovery, and overall health. You can view yours on Oura's Sleep and Readiness tabs.

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The following are unwritten rules that you can follow when looking at your RHR in Oura:

 • Low RHR is often associated with good fitness and overall health.

 • High RHR is often associated with stress (both good and bad).

 • Unusually high RHR can be a sign that something is challenging your system. Consider taking it easy if you notice a spike.

Your lowest RHR during sleep can serve as a good baseline for your overall wellbeing. If you see your lowest RHR in the first half of your night's sleep, it can be considered a sign of good recovery.

To learn more about RHR and HRV, visit The Pulse.

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